Stop trying to fix things – let go

Stop trying to fix it. Let goI’m speaking words of wisdom today – “Stop trying to fix things – let go”. It doesn’t mean I always practice what I preach though, and I know this is hard for some of us, so I thought I’d reassure you that it does work, when you “let go”.

There’s been lots of times in my life when as soon as I’ve made the decision to “let go”, everything has fallen into place, I’ve felt physically and mentally better. Many of these times have been about issues that weren’t even of my making – things I couldn’t actually affect, but in my head, if I didn’t “fix” them, I couldn’t do x, y and z. Ahh, I can see you’re nodding. You’ve been there too?

Some of us pray, and/or meditate, and/or journal (write things down to get them out of your head), and/or talk the ear off a friend, to allow things out. I’m an advocate of Listening , and know that by sharing what’s in your head with someone else, will help you find your own solution to what’s holding you back.

Even when we’ve let something out, though, I’ve often found that I want to “make things better” and “fix” things. For example, when something goes a bit haywire, and not as expected, I want to tidyup loose ends, and make sure everyone’s OK. Are you like that too?

Just like the situations where other people or situations are affecting me, and I can’t do anything about it, I also know, (deep down), that I can’t make things better for others. All I can do is love and care for them, and open my ears when they want to talk. I can’t fix things for other people, as much as I want to – they have to do it for themselves, with or without my help.

I’ve had a situation this month which has really got me down, simply because I wanted to make things right for someone else. The fact that they don’t want to accept my help, or my listening ears has been hard for me to accept. I’ve tried different tactics to make things right, but nothing has worked. It was only when a friend helped me realise this, that I was able to finally “let go”. In my own way I’ve sent them love and will always be here for them if they want my help. It’s time to move on, and I’ve finally realised that this is a life lesson I need to practice ALL the time.

I know, I’m a fixer, and want life to be wonderful for everyone. That’s because I know it can be wonderful! But we, as an individual, have to believe that, and make our own decisions. I’m a true believer of “what you put out, you get back”, and I’ve been holding myself together for too long trying to fix something that isn’t mine to fix. I’ve been spending time and energy on something that I can’t actually affect!

Hmm, so you see my dilemma? I’m a carer, a fixer, and want everyone to be happy. My friend told me, “you’re a confident, empathic, talented, skillful, wise, funny, supportive, amazing, loving, caring, dynamic, wealthy feminine force in the world”. Wow. That’s been lovely to hear. But I still wanted to fix somebody else. With all these skills and talents, it’s still not enough.

I can only be me. And you can only be you. If you can learn anything from me today, it’s you can only fix things for you. Let go of things which aren’t quite right, and certainly the things you’re trying to fix in and for other people.

I’m ready to move forward with new exciting challenges and opportunities & share my love and passions with others. Are you?

If you’d like help with letting go of something, (or someone), let’s spend some time together so I can support you to stop fixing things, and let go.

Listening, being creative and writing for your business

Thoughts from my week – I hope they inspire you to be creative, listen to yourself, and write. We all have talents and skills hidden away. I believe today is the day to start finding them and using them ๐Ÿ™‚

Happy Friday & it’s a beautiful autumnal sunny day here for me right now. I hope it stays that way for the weekend ahead – eldest has his final athletics competition of the year in Lincolnshire, and it’s always a nicer weekend without the rain!

It’s been a strange start to September for me, with some clients moving away from needing support, (which is always fantastic to see), new ones asking for help, and some projects going live. It’s exciting and scary all at once. I’ve had the opportunity to explore new opportunities, and open my mind to my creativity, which is fascinating. Do you open your mind to creating new things each week? (new recipe, new idea, new textile, new exercise?) I highly recommend it. It’s very freeing.

Listen to yourself you have your best interests at heartI’ve delivered a Listening course this week as well, in a volunteer role for the One2One Listening project in Preston, Lancashire. Training takes so much out of you, as you try and share everything you know in such a way that others understand and can use that information in their own lives. This week we were focusing on listening to ourself, which can often be quite challenging. We often keep our ‘real’ selves hidden, especially from our clients or customers, which means we shy away from our self in every day life. We think it’s not important. But I’ve learnt over the last few years that spending time listening to myself has been the most important part of my personal and business development. This listening has helped me move away from the things (and people) who’ve hurt me, and allowed me to find my confidence to do the things I love – loving my family and supporting others.

This week, I finished the book “Start with Why” by Simon Sinek. You may well know it very well. If so, why didn’t you tell me about it before? I’ll let you read my review rather than talk more about it here. However, I think that’s what I’m going to really focus on now – my Why. Everything I do will fit with my Why from now on. I may have seemed focused up until now, but it’s only these last few weeks that I’ve had my own lightbulb moment which is now helping me move forward with my own goals.

And then this came through this morning – http://mybook.to/bloggingbook The ebook of the 30 day blogging challenge. Today it’s FREE so go grab your copy. You can use the information in this book for all sorts of writing for yourself and/or your business. There’s support and information about how to make your blog/website better & if you want it, there’s a free support group to help you become a better writer/blogger/business owner. I’ve done the challenge a few times, and it’s always helped me move forward – personally and in my businesses. Whatever you want to achieve in your business, and your life, there’ll be some nuggets of advice in this book to help you along the way.

I hope you’ve had a positive start to the new school year, and are excited about the next few months for yourself and your business. I’d love to hear your plans, and what you’re creating with all your skills and talents. Let me know if you’re starting to write publicly for yourself or your business, and I’ll share your work with others.

Have a great weekend. I hope the sun shines on you and your family,

[Book Review] Start with Why, by Simon Sinek

Start With Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone To Take Action

I’ve just finished this book for the second time this year, and now feel ready to share what I’ve learnt from it. I’ve listened to it on journeys, and tucked into the content in the physical book as well, as I’ve been fascinated by the “why” question and how it applies to me.

Simon Sinek is fascinating, and knows how to tell a good story. The book is littered with stories about people and companies who did “start with why”, or who failed, to “start with why”. And even some who started with why, then lost track of it, which caused their businesses to lose sight of their original goal.

Everyone has a why, even if we’re not totally clear about what it is. Those of us who’ve had difficult times, may have gone into those difficulties because of losing sight of our “why”. For me, it totally makes sense that with my first business, I started focusing on the wrong things, (things other people told me were important to a growing business), and the reason I started the business in the first place got lost. I then lost confidence, and because I was focusing on the wrong things, (for me and my business), the business took a bit of a nose dive.

Everyone has a WHY. Your WHY is the purpose, cause or belief that inspires you.

Knowing your WHY gives you a filter to make choices, at work and at home, that will help you find greater fulfillment in all that you do.
Simon Sinek

A lot of personal development starts with “finding your why”, or “your purpose”, or “your thing”. I’ve found that quite hard to understand over these last couple of years, and really get down deep and find my why – the reason for doing what I’m doing now. Now, don’t get me wrong, I’ve known that I want to support others, as I love it, and am good at it, but that’s not enough. However, Simon’s words made more sense from hearing the stories he shared about others, and their why.

I loved the simplicity of Simon’s teaching of the “golden circle” – Why in the centre (Start with Why), then How we do it, and finally, What we do. If we focus on the why, the heart of ourselves, (or our business), then the how and what simply follow. When we start with what we do, it’s harder to understand why we do it.

Have you ever worked for someone, or a company, that you had no idea Why they were in business? Did you respec them and work hard in your job? The people and places I know I’ve worked hardest at, and probably had my most satisfying moments with, have been those where the Why we were doing something was really clear. Agree?

So this year, I’ve been exploring myself more deeply again, and came across this book “Start with Why”. As I said, it’s my second read in 8 months, as I don’t think I really understood how to apply it to myself on the first read. I’m probably quite slow, but that’s OK. Today, having come to the end of the book, I’m smiling and happy to feel that I understand my personal Why again. Yes, it will be different for all of us, but understanding why you’re doing something, even if you’re enjoying it, will ensure you’re bringing the whole of you to the whole of your life and work. I’ve found, through this exploration with Simon, (he’s got a lovely voice by the way, which is very easy to listen to if you get the audio version), that I really wanted to understand more. I’ve been putting things on hold until I grabbed hold of my why from right inside me. I feel I can now shine a really big light on my why which will simply permeate everything I do at home and work, and in my businesses, and with my clients.

My clients probably knew what my why was, as they’ve told me how I make them feel when they work with me! Ha! It’s been more fun reading the book, and learning some of the scientific background that underpins how our mind works, and why, by starting with Why, we’ll be able to live a more balanced life. I’ll let you discover for yourselves what the celery test is, but when you know what your WHY is, everything else will fall into place.

I’d love to hear your thoughts on this book if you’ve read it. Or, if you want to explore what your Why is, let’s share a clarity session shall we? I’d love to help you find your Why more easily than it took me to find mine! ๐Ÿ˜‰


ย Just so you know: If you were to purchase the book from this Amazon link, would give me a few pennies. Any pennies collected this way go into an Elite Athlete Support fund, to support some talented athletes achieve their potential. If youโ€™d like further details about these athletes, please do get in touch and Iโ€™ll send you some more information.

You can change the world, one plastic bag at a time

Did you know that YOU can change the world? Yes you. We all have our part to play, and if we all do our thing, that adds up to a lot, and makes a real difference.

Report predicts that, on the current track, oceans will contain more plastic than fish by 2050 (by weight)

World Economic Forum – More plastic than fish

seal with plastic bag around neckI’ve been concerned about plastic bags for a long time. As a family, we tried to take reusable bags with us before supermarkets had to start charging for them. I always get upset when supermarket till assistants put fruit and veg in a plastic bag at the till, when I’ve chosen not to use one when I’ve picked one pepper up from the store. [Note, we do try and buy from our local market, but we haven’t been that organised recently, but that’s our ideal. Just trying to give you a picture though of my ideals].

On average, we use plastic bags for 12 minutes before getting rid of them, yet they can take fully 500 years to break down in the environment.

Bioplastics and biodegradable plastics

On our recent family holiday to France, I was delighted to see that all the supermarkets we visited used corn starch bags at the fruit and vegetable counters. It seemed to give me a real statement of intent. The French supermarkets haven’t given out plastic shopping bags for years, (it’s a favourite holiday destination for our family), but this was saying to me, “we’re serious about the environment”.

In England, (who were behind Wales and Scotland in introducing the ban on free plastic bags), at first there was concern that the change wouldn’t work. However, I see a lot less people buying 5p or 10p bags now when I visit the supermarkets. Some supermarkets, e.g. Co-operative, use biodegradable plastic for some of their bags.

Wouldn’t it be good if instead of plastic bags to put fruit and veg in, we were able to use paper or corn starch bags instead? To me, it sends a message out, that we’re serious about the enviroment, and doing what we can to improve our world. I can hear my Mum shouting from the heavens now, “No! I want to see my fruit and veg clearly!” Why Mum? Grandma used to collect everything from the market in her shopper, and nothing was separated until she got home. Why on earth do we need everything in clear plastic bags? Urrggghh!

Now, I’m not saying that “How we used to live”, (anyone else remember that programme from Primary school?), was perfect. However, my Grandparents, who were adults and having children during the second world war, knew how to reuse, recycle and mend things. They never threw anything away – my Grandad’s garage was testimont to that! They grew their own vegetables, when they had the space, and they shared in their communities.

Whilst we don’t know what we don’t know with new technology, (and plastic is still relatively new to our world), I think we can all make a difference by consuming less plastic in our lives. I haven’t even mentioned plastic bottles and take away cups, but hey, that’s for another day maybe. You can make a difference every day with the choices you make about the plastic you use and discard.

I’ve signed the Greenpeace Ocean petition , which adds my voice to their campaign. I’m also going to be writing to the supermarkets in my area, and my MP to ask for more work in support of using less plastic. It may not be much, but I can do this. I can make a difference by using less, and talking to others, and asking the question.

What difference will you make to the world this week, month and year?

Containing excitement is bad for your health

We all get giddy with excitement sometimes don’t we, and it’s sometimes hard to contain that excitement. It’s especially hard containing excitement if we’re doing something in secret, or trying something out before telling anyone. Yes, are you with me on this?

Well, I seem to be surrounded by people at the moment who are containing their excitement about one thing or another:

  • I’ve got a client who has gone underground to work on some new ideas for her business which she’s so excited about she can’t even talk about it
  • My youngest son is going to do his first cyclocross event on Saturday, and said, “I don’t think I’ve ever been this excited about an event in my life”
  • Another client has launched their website today, KCJ Gifts, and they’ve beenย  finding it hard to contain their excitement all week
  • Some of my online friends are sharing their excitement about their upcoming activities and events

It’s all very exciting to be around ๐Ÿ™‚

Should we ever contain excitement?

Use your excited energy to spread happinessWe sometimes try and stop our children getting over excited about Father Christmas coming, or their birthday party. But why do we do this? Being excited is a fabulous energy to have, and to share that with others, shares happy times more widely.

Whenever we hold something in, it takes energy too. You’ll hear people talk about ‘letting go’ of fear or anger, as by holding this negative energy in, you’re making things worse. So, if we hold our excited energy in ourselves, and don’t let it out as we feel we should be doing, we’re doing ourselves a disservice too. All that energy we should be sharing, and riding on for our life right now, we’re stopping ourselves moving forward.

Sometimes we stop others from being over excited as we may have people within our close network who are having a difficult time, and we’re concerned that the excitement will exacerbate their hardship. Why? Surely, they’ll be excited for us too? Excitement and happiness is infectious, so we’re preventing someone else from moving forward too.

I love the way that some of the training sessions I’ve been on recently have told us to dance, or sing, to get into “high energy”, and therefore high excitement, before the session, or before the task we’re supposed to be doing. It’s fab! It is energising and it brings a smile to your face. It also brings out the best in you and your work. Try it, put on your favourite dance tune and dance to it before you do your next task. And don’t even try to stop yourself from smiling! ๐Ÿ™‚

So, whilst it’s lovely that we are concerned for others feelings, they really do want the best for you. Don’t contain your excitement. Even if you can’t share the details with others about what you’re working on, please do share your excitement with others, and see the ripple effect it has on those around you.

What are you excited about at the moment? Let’s share your happiness and excitement too ๐Ÿ™‚

 

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Who listens to young people

Whilst it’s lovely to hear how schools, colleges and universities are supporting our young people, does this really address what support young people would choose for themselves? Are young people really being listened to? Do we as parents always listen well?

who can your children talk to to get things off their chest. ListenI had a fascinating chat today with an organisation looking to set up a Listening service in schools, as it’s “what the schools are asking for”. Personally, I think that listening services are needed in all communities, as not everyone has someone they can off-load to, or talk to, about what’s on their mind. You know that when you “get something off your chest” you feel better, but not everyone has the opportunity to tell someone else. This can build up over time, until a crisis happens, or, quite often, it affects a person’s mental health.

It got me thinking though. I trust our teachers and education experts. I trust youth workers, and researchers. However, if a listening service, (or something similar) is set up in a school, will the young people want to use it, and just because leadership teams think it’s a good idea, is this the type of support young people want in school?

Schools and colleges have a whole raft of support systems and services, both in school and from external partners to support young people. I personally know some counsellors who work in schools. There are learning mentors. There’s youth workers. Careers advisers, achievement specialists, and whole raft of other support available. Is a listening service really needed?

From the outside, and looking at this logically, to me, listening allows the young person to use that listening ‘space’ to talk about anything they want. A lot of the other services are quite focused and may be looking helping the young person move from x to y.

But do young people understand what ‘listening’ is? Have many of our children experienced really good listening, so would say, “yes! I would benefit from that!”. Or, is this a service that may sound good when we’re discussing it, but when we put it into practice it may not be quite what’s needed? Have we got a lot of educating to do with young people, (and parents and teachers), for this to really benefit them in the way we know it helps adults who access listening services?

I can see it from all sides. But I’m not a young person, so I can’t see it from their point of view.

What’s your view? What support do young people want? Is having someone to listen to them (or to talk to about anything they like), a good idea?

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Support for Year 11 pupils

Tonight, you’ve guessed it, we’ve been to an information evening at school, to prepare us all for Year 11 (my eldest son). We weren’t too sure what to expect, and there’s certainly a lot of information available to pupils and parents to support year 11 pupils make the best they can of the year ahead.

Parklands High SchoolMy son, I have to say, is already fed up with teachers telling him that this year is important, and “you know you’ve got exams coming up soon”. His reaction yesterday, on day 1, was, “do they really think we’re stupid and don’t know we’ve got GCSEs this year?”. I take his point!

Whilst I’m all for preparation, and understanding the process to give confidence to our young people, there’s also a point at which too much information, advice and support could tip the balance the other way. At the end of day 2, my son is at risk of ‘switching off’ from messages from his teachers, which I know isn’t their intention!

Far from it. Tonight the focus was all about support. The teachers were focused on the growth mindset, (again, this is a term my sons roll their eyes at, but they do understand the intention behind it), focusing on the year 11’s goals, and how best to study for maximum results.

The teachers openly told us that some year 11s are already telling teachers they are worried about the exams. They told us they have support in place to help those who feel pressured, or stressed this year; those who seem not to be taking GCSEs seriously at all, and all those in the middle. I believe them. The results the school achieved this year were excellent – English and Maths results were all above the national average. The school has confidence, and this is rubbing off on the young people.

We were pleased to see that when devising a study timetable that Extra-Curricular activities came top of the list, and to put those in the planner first. Yay! We’re on the same wavelength with school on that one.

The other really pleasing point, which my son won’t be happy about as it’s been an underlying point of dispute this last year, is that of the use of technology, particularly before bedtime. Despite all the research papers we’ve shown him, this backup from school, and their partner organisation Elevate Educate, can’t be ignored. Getting 8.5 hours sleep was seen as really important, and NOT drinking energy drinks. The speaker gave the statistic that if you drink an energy drink you’ll only retain 10% of the information you’re trying to learn….not worth the effort then?

Following on from yesterday’s post, the Greatest gift you can give your child, it’s great to see this support from school, supporting year 11 in a broader way than simply teaching subjects, and learning facts. I understand the new GCSEs are more about applying knowledge, rather than just being able to regurgitate information, and this wider support from school will help the young people to have the confidence to practice their understanding in new ways.

So, whilst no 1 son may feel there’s a lot of focus on “it’s an important year”, at home, we want to ensure he has the right support. The fact that school said, ” use any member of staff you feel happy and confident talking to”, if you have a concern, means the school are working together to offer a caring environment for the children there.

We hope all schools have this approach, or similar, to supporting year 11 pupils, prepare themselves for the year ahead. And we hope it’s a fun year for them all, and gives them lots of happy memories.

Any other advice or suggestions for supporting Year 11 pupils this year?

The greatest gift you can give your child

supporting your talented childI’m not always a facebook fan, but today they reminded me of this photo I’d taken 2 years ago at the TIPS programme, which is part of the School Games.

My eldest son is a talented athlete, and is currently training to be a Decathlete (athletics track and field – remember Daley Thompson? Or you’ve probably heard of Jess Ennis-Hill? Women do 7 events, and men do 10 events). Two years ago he was selected by his county to take part in the Talent Inspiration Programme, as part of the national School Games event.

As part of the 3 day event, parents were invited to attend a workshop, led by Olympian Miriam Luke, who is also now a Mum of 2. She was fabulous, and helped us understand what the young people had been discovering during their time on the programme – namely, that school work is more important than sport, and even though they may be top achievers in their teens, not many young people will go on and be top achievers in that sport in their adult life. [Obviously all sports are different, with elite gymasts being a lot younger, but you get the idea]. She herself didn’t take up her sport until University.

At the time, I took it all in, and as a family we learnt a lot, and have continued to maintain a balanced life and outlook on life.

Today it struck me, as a lot of children return to school, that these principles should be what all parents should be striving for anyway, isn’t it? Why are parents of other children, who aren’t labelled gifted and talented,ย  not given this same advice on how to best help our young people? Surely, if we re-wrote this as,

The greatest gift you can give your child is to give them your support, help them take responsibility, keep their life in balance and support their success.

The greatest gift you can give your child

The greatest gift you can give your childWould anyone argue with having a balanced life?

Would anyone argue with helping our young people take responsibility?

Is there anytime we wouldn’t celebrate their success?

I don’t think so. I think this should be a mantra for all parents to take on at the start of this new school year.

Is this the greatest gift you can give to your child?

Friends across the miles

Polish penpal and her daughterWe’ve just returned from a lovely quick trip to London, (takes about 4 hours driving if we’re lucky) to meet my childhood friend and penpal from Poland. We haven’t seen each other for about 10 years, even though we communicate every few months.

Justyna and I have been friends since I was about 13, when a lady from Church, who knew I was in Guides, asked if I knew someone in Guides who’d like to have a Polish Penpal who was a Scout. I jumped at the chance, and 30+ years later we’re still friends across the miles.

This fairly spontaneous trip has raised a few memories when my boys, and other friends, have asked about our friendship. Things I’ve taken as part our relationship, sound quite bizarre in 2017.

Behind the Iron Curtain

Justyna, when I first knew her, was in Scouts, but it was secret. It had to be in Communist Poland. She sent me a photograph once, (which she was frightened would be confiscated) of the scout group meeting by candlelight.

I wish I’d kept her letters, (I threw them out when I was decluttering), as she not only was learning to speak better English, but she shared a lot about her life in Poland. I’ve always been fascinated by how other people live, and their cultures.

She often talked about queuing for bread, and having a very basic diet. When I visited for the first time in 1990, her Mum still cooked very basic food on very simple cooking stove, in a very small apartment. They were so self sufficient, and were so happy with what they had, it made me feel uncomfortable with what I had available to me.

My most embarassing moment, ever, was when I bought some flowers as a thank you for letting me stay. I spent the equivalent of ยฃ5 at the time, which bought a massive bouquet of gorgeous flowers. I remember getting lots of looks on the bus as I travelled home that day, and Justyna’s Mum was virtually in tears when I gave them to her. The present was too much. I’d bought “enough flowers for a wedding”. What I thought was kindness, was showing how much wealth I had. I was mortified! By trying to give a gift, I’d offended them ๐Ÿ™

Friends across the miles

It’s been a lovely friendship we’ve shared. Not all penpals get to meet, or get on as well as we do. Justyna came to my wedding, and we’ve met a few times in the UK and in Poland over the years.

Today we met her daughter for the first time. She’s 9, and bilingual – her father is English, and they speak English at home. Oh, I don’t think I said – Justyna achieved her goal of getting better at English, and teaches English in Poland to Polish, as well as foreign students. My boys were “well impressed” [their words]. Aisha likes football, judo and chess, as well as Sherlock Holmes, although her state school in Poland doesn’t allow for girls to play football. She was lovely, and I think we’ve made a new friend there too.

Despite it being 10 years since we physically met, we all picked up where we left off – laughing and joking, reminiscing and sharing. Learning from each other about what we all think about Brexit and effect it will have on their family and ours. We walked through a couple of London parks, kicked a football around, played “piggy in the middle” with a small rugby ball, had a drink, and took some photos of each other.

We spent just under 3 hours together. That time was priceless. Not only did we get a very quick trip to London under our belts, which we all love, we met a long term friend from across the miles, and rekindled the friendship we’ve shared since we were teenagers.

With today’s technology, it’s much easier to communicate, and you don’t have to wait weeks for letters to be written and go through the postal system. I will encourage my boys to create long distance friendships, and whilst they don’t always work out, there’s always so much we can learn from friends around the world – even those who have been near, and moved away.

Do you have any long distance friends? Did you meet your penpal? I’d love to hear your story.

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A change is as good as a rest, they say.

At the end of the summer holidays and many of us are reflecting how much we’ve enjoyed the rest, or the change in routine, and whether we’ll ever do ‘that’ again. You’ve heard the saying, “A change is as good as a rest”, but is it always true?

Rest don't rely on changeI’ve just come back from having the most relaxing holiday ever. Whilst we were all very ready to literally do nothing for 11 days in the Lot area of France, I didn’t think that it would do us the good that it has. We enjoy visiting different places, and doing different things, and benefit from the change in scenery. However, the total rest and relaxation we’ve just had has been well worth it and we need to plan that type of “away from it all” holiday regularly to totally recharge our batteries.

My boys, aged 15 and 13, are very sporty and we often have competitions at weekends, mainly in the North West of England, but sometimes in other parts of the country. Whilst we love this family time together, and seeing different towns and places, there’s a lot of organising to be done. Even if it’s just getting the picnic sorted for the day, (eldest does athletics, and youngest does triathlons currently), there’s things to think about. “Have you got your spikes/bike helmet/pins (for your race number)” is something we all have to think about, so you don’t totally relax on the day. Even after they’ve competed there’s things like, “have you done all the stretches and recovery warm down you need to do?”.

We’re fortunate in so many ways to spend this time together doing different things, having a change from our normal everyday activities. We love what we’re able to do, but it’s not relaxing.

Having stocked the fridge up, got the suncream on, there was nothing else to do but relax in our holiday home in France. It’s been a long time since we didn’t have plans to ‘do this’ or ‘see that’. I think it helped that the weather was over 30 degrees everyday, so we really didn’t feel like doing much. We just sat, read, swam in the pool, ate, drank (lots of water!). Fortunately there was Wi-fi so the boys were happy & their ‘nothing’ involved snap chatting & watching you tube videos!

I’m not usually very good at doing nothing, so the holiday was perfect and the sole reason for being there was to relax. 10 books later, (I’m so pleased the house had a little library of some of my favourite authors), I feel refreshed and almost like a different person. I’d forgotten quite how much you unwind when there’s nothing to organise, or do.

As a family we played games, swam in the pool, went shopping together, (which was lovely planning meals together). We had a couple of trips out, with a lovely relaxing float down the River Cele, and wander around Cahors. That was part of the relaxation, and was perfect.

A change is as good as a rest

So, I actually disagree with this saying now. A change is a great way of telling your brain and body that you need to do something different. But for total rest, you need to totally switch off, and do something totally different. For me, the fact that we didn’t have anything to plan for, nothing to organise, check, double check, was a change and a rest. Both things together. Wow! Perfect ๐Ÿ™‚

Do you think a change is as good as a rest?